2010 in Review

2010 in Review

2010 in review banner

A look back at the year that was 2010.

As another year draws to a close, I decided it would be nice to reflect back on the year that was here at wikidot, and in particular this here little blog. For me, it is hard to believe that only nine months ago I started up css3.wikidot.com as a place to document my continued learning of CSS and the wonderful wikidot platform. It started off with a rather rough theme that probably only worked properly in Safari and Chrome, but as my knowledge of CSS and web design has grown, so too has the design of this site, and it should now display correctly in most major browsers, even if it’s still a little rough in IE.

Alongside the blog I said I was going to release some new themes for wikidot, and then promptly released just one theme in about 8 months. This has since changed, and there are now a number of quality BMC themes available on the wikidot themes site, each a little better than the last as my knowledge of CSS continues to develop. I want to continue to provide the community with quality free themes, and early in 2011 you will hopefully see a number of new BMC themes.

As the year progressed I also started promising premium wikidot themes, but I am still yet to deliver on that promise. At this point, I have decided releasing premium themes is not within my immediate plans for 2011, due to a number of factors, the major one being not knowing how big a market there is for paid wikidot themes. A significant investment in time is required to make sure the premium themes are absolutely perfect. At the moment I just don’t have that time to spare, but maybe one day I will get around to it.

Having developed my CSS skills to an acceptable level, at some point in the year I decided I would offer a custom theme service; initially for free, and then I progressed to a paid model based on the size and scope of each design. While the number of requests has been small, I am proud of each one; those that I have finished, and others that are on-going projects.

The BMC Blog

surge in site visitors

Back here at the blog, while posts have been few and far between of late, I am proud of each one of the 38 entries, and I hope they provided some inspiration for your own projects. Some took off thanks to a mention or two on twitter, others sit idly by with no comments. Here's the top posts of the last 9 months.

Most viewed

  1. Infobox with Pure CSS 3D Ribbon
  2. Creating a pure CSS content slider
  3. Elegant Image Frame
  4. Freebie - New wikidot editor buttons
  5. Animated page entry with CSS3

Personal favourites

What's new around here?

There are some new features here at the BMC Blog that I’ve implemented recently, the most notable being a new page-based forum to replace the default wikidot comments module. This wonderful forum, developed by leiger, tsangk and others, allows for much greater flexibility, including no pagination, bigger avatars and highlighting of the author’s comments. There's still a couple of niggles that need ironing out, such as anchors not working in the redirect from the post category to the parent thread. I encourage you to try it out and let me know if anything doesn't work as expected. I also owe thanks to rurwin for providing the Whiffle program that allowed me to tag all existing blog pages in one swoop, which allowed me to implement the new comments without disrupting the existing comments modules.

And a gold star goes to whoever can work out what else is new around here…

RoaringApps logo

What the future holds

In 2011, I have a number new projects that I am excited about; some my own venture into the world wide web, others larger projects aiming for the stars. I also plan on posting a CSS guide series to explain the basics of CSS and CSS3 (another promised but not-yet delivered feature here at css3.wikidot.com), and I have some other smaller wikidot sites I look forward to releasing.

A great big thank you

I would not be writing here today if it were not for the people who read this little blog, so to everyone who has ever read one of my posts, a big thank you. A special thanks goes to the dedicated members of the wikidot community and development team, who have always had an answer for my sometimes dumb questions, especially as I was still trying to grasp the vast number of wikidot features. Your dedication to this wonderful platform still astounds me, and I am so glad I somehow stumbled across this lovely little community.

I wish a belated Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to everyone here at wikidot, and I look forward to seeing what new features and sites get developed in 2011. See you then!

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tags — 2010 review site updates

Discussion - 15 comments

Anonymous avatar

AnonymousAnonymous 31 Dec 2010 23:34

So this is the new comments system?

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bcammo avatar

Anonymousbcammo 01 Jan 2011 00:11

Yes, this is it mystery man (or woman). What do you think?

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Anonymous avatar

AnonymousAnonymous 01 Jan 2011 00:13

Cool!

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tsangk avatar

Anonymoustsangk 01 Jan 2011 00:18

Look fabulous Bryce. Are you gonna show us the CSS to the comments system?

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Ed Johnson avatar

AnonymousEd Johnson 01 Jan 2011 01:07

Yes, you've disguised it very well to look like the comments module. Your methods would be great fodder for a new blog post. Happy New Year and thanks for all of your great contributions!

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leiger avatar

Shane (leiger)Anonymousleiger 01 Jan 2011 05:12

Bryce, you've exceeded my expectations with the comments system once again.

It. Looks. Amazing.

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bcammo avatar

Anonymousbcammo 01 Jan 2011 06:55

I'm glad you all like it! I'll look at creating a blog post with how to do the borders around the avatars.

I've been trying to work out a way to get the anchors to work in the redirect, so that the page jumps to the correct post. I have a working javascript redirect here, which you can see in action here. It works fine when you enter it directly in the URL, but not when you post a new comment (it loads within the iframe). I have tried every iteration of window.location and window.open I can think of, but I just can't get it to work. Any ideas?

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leiger avatar

Anonymousleiger 01 Jan 2011 08:20

No need to use Javascript at all, just use the Redirect module in the post template.

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bcammo avatar

Anonymousbcammo 01 Jan 2011 08:56

The problem with the redirect module on its own is that when you post a comment, it loads the page within the iframe. At the moment I'm using the slash redirect snippet with the redirect module, which somehow forces the page to open in the main window, but when I add anchors it breaks. So I tried the javascript solution above (which also uses the redirect module) to try and get the best of both worlds: anchors + opening in main window, but to no avail (yet).

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tsangk avatar

Anonymoustsangk 01 Jan 2011 14:02

Try and redirect to a page with the following JavaScript code :window.top.location.href="http://example.com/index.php#comments

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bcammo avatar

Anonymousbcammo 01 Jan 2011 23:56

Okay, so after way too much trial and error, I think I have it working properly now. The problem was that no matter what I tried, redirecting to an anchor from within the iframe would always load within the iframe. I'm assuming this is because it figured it didn't need to reload the page just to move to an anchor.

After nearly giving up, I realised I could use [[iftags]] to only add the anchor redirect once the page had been created (and tagged) - and I got really excited that I had worked it out… until I found out that if you define tags in the url when you create a page (as I was doing to the iframed editor), those tags exist straight away, even as you click the save button. So my glorious plan had failed.

In one last-ditch attempt at getting it to work, I tried to use two redirects - one to get out of the iframe and into the main window (without defining an anchor), and then another to redirect to the parent page & the post's anchor. And surprise, surprise… it worked! You can see it in action right here. Feel free to create a comment on that page to see it for yourself. My question to you is do you think going through two redirects is worth it to get to an anchor on the page? I would love to know what you think…

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Ed Johnson avatar

AnonymousEd Johnson 01 Jan 2011 23:59

I just noticed that older blog posts are still using the comments module. I'm curious how you're managing this. I assume you have the comments module and/or the no comment code in the live template. Are you using [[iftags]] to do this or is it some other method?

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Ed Johnson avatar

AnonymousEd Johnson 02 Jan 2011 00:06

My question to you is do you think going through two redirects is worth it to get to an anchor on the page? I would love to know what you think…

I think I like it, with one caveat… The one down side is that the browser back button keeps hitting the redirect page after creating a post and that's annoying. We're all used to dealing with it all over the web, so it may not be a big deal to others.

Regardless, that's a fine piece of work to get functioning!

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bcammo avatar

Anonymousbcammo 02 Jan 2011 00:07

Yep, [[iftags]]. I tagged all the existing posts with _archive2010 using rurwin's Whiffle program, and then used:

[[iftags -_archive2010]]
[!-- NoComment system --]
[[/iftags]]

[[iftags +_archive2010]]
[[module Comments]]
[[/ifags]]

The other option was to rename all the existing posts to another category, but then this would have broken all existing links, so I decided to go with the iftags option.

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leiger avatar

Anonymousleiger 02 Jan 2011 03:12

The iftags option is more natural anyway - unless you're looking for the difference, you can hardly notice the change in the commenting system.

The only major difference is the use of avatars in the newer posts.

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